Aug 20

Raise Your Writing Standards

Are Your writing standards high enough?Contributed by Suzanne Lieurance

I watched a video of Tony Robbins on YouTube the other day and he said something that really stuck with me.

He said, “If you are unhappy with anything in your life, simply raise your standards in that area.”

So what did he mean by that?

Well, according to Robbins, we all have standards that we have set for ourselves in all areas of our life.

These standards are the way we see ourselves and the way we think we are supposed to live.

We have health and fitness standards, relationship standards, and wealth standards, for example.

We probably set these standards for ourselves long ago based on something we were told or taught.

But, the thing is, many times these standards no longer apply to the life we want to be living now.

For example, long ago someone might have told you that you were overweight and it was a genetic thing.

You were just destined to be overweight and there wasn’t much you could do about it.

So guess what?

You either accepted that and used it to create low health and fitness standards for yourself or you failed to believe it and raised your standards in this area.

If you raised your health and fitness standards, you started eating right and exercising regularly and eventually you were no longer overweight.

It might not have been easy.

But it wasn’t impossible once you raised your standards.

We Set Writing Standards for Ourselves, Too

If you’re a writer, you’ve set standards for this aspect of your life, too.

But have you set your writing standards too low?

If so, you probably aren’t getting published regularly and you aren’t making much money from your writing.

Examine the way you have set and accepted low standards for yourself as a writer.

Next, decide to raise your standards as a writer.

Write down your new standards so you’re really clear about how you want to see yourself as a writer and how you want to live the writer’s life according to these new standards.

Try it!

For more writing tips and resources delivered to your e-mailbox every weekday morning, get your free subscription to The Morning Nudge from Suzanne Lieurance, the Working Writer’s Coach.

Reprinted with permission from:
http://www.writersonthemove.com/2016/09/raise-your-standards.html

Writing for children tipsTraditionally Publishing – Keep Submitting
Small Book Publishers Fill the Gap
Building a Writing Career Takes Practice and Focus

Be a children's writer

Being a writer, like being any kind of artist who creates something from nothing, is an amazing ability. It’s almost like magic. And, you are in control. You decide what to create. The only limit you have is the cap on your imagination.

Check out my 180 page ebook that gives you all the basics of WRITING FICTION FOR CHILDREN. It’s newly revised and includes information on finding a publisher or agent, and marketing your books.

Writing Children's Fiction

Aug 13

Read as a Writer

Tips on writing your storyEvery writer has been told to read, read, read. Read as much as you can to improve your own writing skills.

Well, I read an interesting article at Writer Unboxed that explained why simply reading to improve your writing won’t cut it.

According to the author, Julianna Baggott Faculty Director of Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing and Publishing, “I’ve found that some of my most thoroughly read students – the ones who devour and love every book they come across – are some of my hardest to teach. I believe that how one reads is essential. And if you don’t master reading as a writer, sheer quantity will be of little use.”

Baggott broke down reading as a writer into five categories: blueprint reading, territory reading, language reading, portal reading, singular lens reading.

Breaking them down:

1. Blueprint reading.

This goes back to read, read, read. While she kind of said this doesn’t work, she does agree that reading in volume does give you an idea of how a book is written to get published. (assuming you’re reading traditionally published books.)

For my writing, I like this type of reading. Seeing how the author puts the story together, how he builds his characters, how she keeps the conflict rising, how he ties up all loose ends . . .

It is a great tool to learn ‘good’ writing.

2. Territory reading.

This is reading to take ideas away with you. It could be from the topic, a chapter, a scene. At least this is what I think the author is saying.

I’ve done this. I’ll be reading a children’s book and an idea pops up. It may just be something I’m reading that takes me in a new direction. But, it can get the creativity flowing.

3. Language reading.

Reading with language in mind is to see the words that are used.

I do this often. While Baggott uses it for ideas and transitions into topics, I use it for the actual words. I love to see what words authors use to convey an emotion, a sensation, a description, and so on.

I also keep a database of words I find that I might be able to use down the road. So, just like the author of the article, I’ll have words circled or underlined in the books I read.

4. Portal reading.

I’ll be honest, I’m not quite sure what the author is saying for this reading experience. As far as I can tell, it’s reading and through the scene be transported into your own story. The book somehow acts as a muse to give you insights into your own story.

This hasn’t happened to me.

5. Singular lens reading.

This one is more about seeing everything through the story you’re writing. You look at book covers, titles, contents and how it relates to your story.

As Baggott puts it, “This reading is how you look at the world around you when you’re so deeply involved in a project that everything you encounter gets filtered through that one lens.”

As a ghostwriter, I’m usually working on more than one story at a time plus my own stories. Because of this I don’t really get ‘singular lens’ anything.

But, it’s easy to see how this can happen.

Summing it up.

Being a writer, I notice how I read different than someone who doesn’t write. I see grammar. I see sentence structure, chapter structure, story structure, character building and sometimes all this is at the sake of the story itself. I’ll have to stop myself to actually just read the story.

But, this is what writers do consciously or subconsciously. We can’t help it.

And, now you have five reading styles to help you write your stories.

Have you found yourself using any of these?

Reference:
5 Ways to Read as a Writer

Articles on writing for childrenWriting for Children – Character Believability and Conflict
The Outline Method of Writing (Are You an Outliner?)
The Book Summary – Five Must-Know Components

Let's talk about your children's writing project

Let me take a look at it. I’m a working children’s ghostwriter, rewriter, and editor. I can turn your story into a publishable book that you’ll be proud to be author of.

Shoot me an email at: kcioffiventrice@gmail.com (please put Children’s Writing Help in the Subject line). Or, you can give me a call at 834—347—6700

Aug 06

Traditionally Publishing – Keep Submitting

Traditional PublishingWhile most of my ghosting clients self-publish, there are some who go the traditional route. This is definitely commendable, but it does require patience and tenacity.

If you have a story you believe in and want to go the traditional route, then dig your heels in, roll-up your sleeves and start submitting.

Keep in mind you don’t have to submit to publishers only, you can submit to agents also. Whoever you’re submitting to, just be sure to read their guidelines super-careful and adhere to them like your life depends on it. Give your manuscript every chance it deserves. You don’t want an acquisitions editor to immediately dismiss your manuscript because the query letter or cover letter isn’t in line with the guidelines. You want to at least get your manuscript in the door and read.

Another thing to remember is that it’s not uncommon at all for an author to receive well over a hundred rejections before the story finds a home. I always use Chicken Soup for the Soul as an example because it’s stuck in my brain. The authors were rejected 144 times before getting a contract!

Think about that. One hundred and forty-four times! That’s a lot of rejection. If they had stopped at 143 . . . well, you get it.

And, it could be your manuscript won’t be acknowledged until 160 or 170 or more submissions.

That contract could be down a very long winding road, but you never know when it’s just around that turn. If you don’t submit, you’ll never know. If you don’t persevere, you’ll never know.

Once you have your finished manuscript, do the research. Find publishers and agents who handle your genre. Find out how to write an effective query letter. Then submit, submit, submit . . .

You’ll also want to attend in-person writing conferences, if it’s feasible. I had a middle grade story client who got 10 out of 14 bites at a conference in New York. Strong enough bites that she was asked to send chapters of the book.

Again, you just never know. Go for it and keep going for it until you get it.

MORE ON WRITING FOR CHILDREN

Storytelling vs. Writing a Story
6 Tips to What Makes a Good Story?
Submitting Your Manuscript – 8 Tips

Be a children's writer

Being a writer, like being any kind of artist who creates something from nothing, is an amazing ability. It’s almost like magic. And, you are in control. You decide what to create. The only limit you have is the cap on your imagination.

Check out my 180 page ebook that gives you all the basics of WRITING FICTION FOR CHILDREN. It’s newly revised and includes information on finding a publisher or agent, and marketing your books.

Writing Children's Fiction

Jul 30

Small Book Publishers Fill the Gap

Helping Authors Get PublishedOne of your primary concerns as an author is to get your book published. While self-publishing is a viable option, many authors still strive to be traditionally published.

The problem though is getting your manuscript past the acquisitions editor of a major publishing house. And, while I always say nothing ventured nothing gained, getting published by one of the “Big 5” publishers isn’t very probable for a new author. (Though, never say never.)

According to Book Business, the Big 5 are: Penguin Random House, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, Hachette, and Macmillan. (1)

And, while you may have a better chance with one of the Big 5’s imprints, getting published will still be a tough goal to achieve.

So, what do authors who want to be traditionally published do?

Simple, they submit to small publishers.

In an interview with her local paper, Edmond, Oklahoma, Vivian Zabel said, “There needs to be something between the major publishers who won’t accept anything and the vanity or self-publishing entities.”

Taking the ‘bull by the horns,’ Zabel created her own small publishing company, 4RV Publishing. It’s put out 115 quality books over the last 10 years. They publish from children’s books up.

Zabel went on to say, “4RV looks for authors who fall through the cracks at major publishing houses.”

Larger publishers look for the “marquis authors.” Because of this, 4RV gets to find some great stories.

To read about 4RV and get an idea of how a small publisher works, check out Zabel’s interview at: Small Publisher Fills the Gap Between Major and Vanity Publishing

Reference:
(1) http://www.bookbusinessmag.com/post/big-5-financial-reports-reveal-state-traditional-book-publishing/

Let's talk about your children's writing projectLet me take a look at it. I’m a working children’s ghostwriter, rewriter, and editor. I can turn your story into a publishable book that you’ll be proud to be author of.

Shoot me an email at: kcioffiventrice@gmail.com (please put Children’s Writing Help in the Subject line). Or, you can give me a call at 834—347—6700

Articles on writing for childrenWriting – It’s Not Wise to Revise Too Soon
Writing for Children – 4 Simple Tips
Writing for Children – Character Believability and Conflict

Jul 23

The Author Website – 5 Top Tips to Optimization

Optimized Author WebsiteAt this point in time, with the internet an integral part of book marketing, EVERYONE knows that if you’re writing a book or have a book already done, you must have an author website. (If you fall into this category and don’t have a site up yet, get it started today.)

So what are the top tips for an effective author website?

Let’s start before the visitor is actually lands on your website.

1. You need an easy and readable domain name (URL).

Examples of good domain names for authors might be:

– children’s writer
– romance writer
– historical writer
– writing romance
– writing for children
– mystery writing
– suspense author

You get the idea.

The problem though is that most ‘good’ domains are already taken. So, what can you do?

Simply add your name to the domain:
karencioffiwritingforchildren.com

If you can’t find the perfect name for your site, just add your name to it.

Why this is effective is because although your name is in it, which has NO SEO value unless you’re someone like James Patterson, you do have the wanted keyword in it. In my case, “writingforchildren.”

Having a keyword effective domain name allows people searching for your niche to have a better chance of finding you. And, it lets the search engines know what your site is about. This is all good for you.

The following tips relate to when someone lands on your site.

2. One of the first things a visitor will see is your website title and subtitle.

This is where you can elaborate on your domain name. Using my website again as an example, my title is: Writing for Children with Karen Cioffi. To make it more effective, more optimized, my subtitle is: Ghostwriting, Rewriting, Editing, Freelance Writing.

This gives me great keywords that are relevant to my website and it also immediately lets the visitor know what my site is about. It also helps the search engines further define my site.

3. You want your site easy to navigate.

This means having a visible menu bar (navigation bar).

It seems every day people have less and less time to read what your author website is about. Count yourself lucky if a visitor stays on your site for 5 or more seconds.

Basically, you want the visitor to immediately know what you’re about and you want that visitor to be able to quickly find what he’s looking for.

Does he want to visit your resources page? Does she want to visit your testimonials page? Does he want to visit your books page?

Have the menu bar front and center. Let your visitors quickly find where they want to go.

The best place for the menu is just below your website header. People are used to seeing it there and it’s about the easiest place to find it and use it.

4. Your landing page content should be focused and easy to read.

From your landing page (home page) title to the heading to the content itself, let the visitor know what she can find on your site. Let her know what she can GET on your site. Let her know how your site can help her, enlighten her, amuse her.

Keep your site focused and tight. People don’t want to read 1000 words on a landing page anymore. They want to find what they want and get out lickety-split.

Keep it simple and easy to read. Use subheadings, bold, colored text, and even highlights to bring the reader to the important things quickly. Lots of readers are skim readers (I’m one) – they’ll appreciate the ease of reading.

5. Have a call-to-action (CTA) that works.

The first thing a visitor to your site will notice about your CTA is if its striking. Be sure the visitor can quickly find it too.

This brings up another point, the location. Keep the CTA, especially if it’s for a subscriber list, at the top of your sidebar. You can also put it in the content itself and at the end. Give your visitor plenty of opportunity to click on it.

If you have a website header that provides for it, add it to your header also.

There are also the slide-in or pop-up CTAs. I’m not crazy about these and don’t use them – I think they’re intrusive and annoying. But, if you feel you can get more conversion with it, give it a try.

Next, make the text in the CTA short and sweet and CLEAR (very easy to understand).

You want to make it motivating. It should also be actionable. Use action verbs with a time element: Download Now / Get Started Today / Buy Now.

You need to actually tell the visitor what to do. So, don’t use copy like, “Need Help?” Use copy like, “Get Help Today!”

Summing it up.

There you have it, five tips to help you create and/or maintain an effective author website as the foundation of your book marketing. And, aside from your domain name, you can tweak just about everything else on a website if it’s not working as it should – if it’s not getting conversions.

* Conversion is what happens when a visitor clicks on one of your CTAs. It’s a visitor taking action. This is a primary purpose of your author website.

WANT TO BE A CHILDREN’S WRITER?

Being a writer, like being any kind of artist who creates something from nothing, is an amazing ability. It’s almost like magic. And, you are in control. You decide what to create. The only limit you have is the cap on your imagination.

Check out my 180 page ebook that gives you all the basics of WRITING FICTION FOR CHILDREN, (including finding a publisher or agent, and marketing your books).

Articles on writing for childrenAmazon Author Central Page and Book Page – Make the Most of Them
Picture Books – Story or Illustrations, Which Comes First?
Writing – Showing vs. Telling

 

Jul 16

Writer’s Digest Annual Conference , NYC

Writing and Book MarketingThe Writer’s Digest Annual Conference August 18-20, 2017 in New York City

This “conference offers everything you need to advance creatively and professionally as a writer—no matter what stage of your career. And it’s all brought to you by Writer’s Digest, the experts at nurturing and developing new writers for more than 90 years.”

Speakers lined up include literary agents and bestselling authors.

Topics that will be covered include:

Getting published
Platform and promotion
The business of being an author
Writing craft
Genre studies

And, there’s a ‘Pitch Slam.” You get to pitch to agents!

One of my middle grade clients went to the 2016 one and took part in the ‘Pitch Slam.’ She got interest from several agents.

If you have a manuscript and want an excellent event to show it off and find out what literary agents are really looking for, click the link: http://writersdigestconference.com/index.php

HERE ARE A COUPLE OF ARTICLES ON WRITING YOU MIGHT BE INTERESTED IN:

Getting to Know Your Characters

Plot and Your Story – Four Formats

Submitting Your Manuscript – 8 Tips

Jul 09

Are You a Writer? You’ve Got to Keep Learning and Growing

Writing tips and tricksGuest Post by Suzanne Lieurance

I can always tell when someone knows almost ‘nothing’ about writing.

They are the ones who think they already know ‘everything’.

They’re the ones who can’t be bothered to take a writing class or a
writer’s workshop, or work with a writing coach.

They are the ones who believe they don’t need to have their work critiqued.

Or, if for some reason they do manage to have someone critique their work,
they don’t think the suggestions they get for improving their writing have
any merit.

After all, they already know how to write.

Why do they need to make things clearer?

Nonsense. If the reader can’t figure out what they are trying to say,
that’s the fault of the reader, not theirs.

So why do I tell you all this?

To help you realize that all writers have much to learn.

All writers can benefit from a writing class, a writer’s workshop, or from
working with a writing coach or a mentor.

The writers who tend to know the most about writing are the ones who
realize how much they ‘don’t know’, and they do everything they can to
learn more all the time.

Whether you’re new to writing or you’ve been at it for awhile, be sure you
continue to read, read, read the types of things you wish to write.

Continue to take classes, attend writer’s workshops, and even work with a
writing coach so you are learning more about the business of writing and
the writing process all the time.

Above all else, practice, practice, practice your craft, which means you
must simply, write, write, write.

For more writing tips and resources delivered to your e-mailbox every weekday morning, get your free subscription to The Morning Nudge from Suzanne Lieurance, the Working Writer’s Coach.

—–

Suzanne’s right. Honing your writing craft is a must, if you’re a writer.

But, what if you’re not a writer and don’t want to become one. But, what if you have this amazing idea for a children’s book and desperately want to get it published. You want your name as author on the book. What do you do?

You hire a children’s ghostwriter. You hire me!

Let me take a look at your idea or outline or story. I’m a working children’s ghostwriter and rewriter. I can turn your story into a publishable book that you’ll be proud to be author of.

Shoot me an email at: kcioffiventrice@gmail.com (please put Children’s Writing Help in the Subject line). Or, you can give me a call at 834—347—6700

—–

MORE ON WRITING FOR CHILDREN

Writing Skills – Spread Your Wings

Writing Success – Know Your Intent

10 Tips to Hiring With a Children’s Ghostwriter

Jul 02

Amazon Author Central Page and Book Page – Make the Most of Them

Book PromotionYep. As an author, you need to promote your books. If you don’t, you won’t sell any. It’s all about creating visibility . . . after you’ve created a quality book.

A great place to generate visibility and SELL your books is Amazon. And, it’s probably one of the most underutilized pieces of online real estate that authors should be taking advantage of?

According to Statista.com, Amazon was the most popular online store in the United States in 2016.

And, according to a 2014 article in Forbes on Amazon vs. Book Publishers, Amazon’s annual revenue from book sales was $5.25 billion. And, that was back in 2014. Amazon sells a lot of books, so authors should have an Amazon author page and make the most of their book page.

But, how do you make the best use of your Amazon real estate? Your book page and Author Central page?

It’s all in the details for both pages.

– First thing is to have a professional book cover. This is probably the first thing a potential reader looks at.

– Next you need a killer description and be sure to make it keyword effective.

– Along with this, be sure to add your top reviews to the Editorial Reviews section.

– Then there’s your author bio. Make sure the reader knows what you’re about and what you can offer.

From the Author page, you can add lots of tidbits to enhance the page, like freebies, upcoming events, and more.

And, there are also things like keywords and categories that you should use to help make your book searchable.

The point is to take advantage of this great marketing tool. Amazon is powerful. You need to use every feature it offers to make your book visible to its customers and motivate them to buy it!

For a detailed article on how to boost your Amazon book page and author page, on how to sell more books, check out this article at Author Marketing Experts:
Sell More Books with a Kickass Amazon Book Page

Articles on writing for children
Picture Books – Story or Illustrations, Which Comes First?
Writing – Showing vs. Telling
Tips to Overcome Writing Procrastination

Need Help With Your Story

Let me take a look at it. I’m a working children’s ghostwriter, rewriter, and editor. I can turn your story into a publishable book that you’ll be proud to be author of.

Shoot me an email at: kcioffiventrice@gmail.com (please put Children’s Writing Help in the Subject line). Or, you can give me a call at 834—347—6700

Jun 25

Storytelling vs. Writing a Story

Writing tips and strategiesIs there a difference between storytelling and writing a story?

Yes, there is.

A children’s publisher commented on the difference between storytelling and writing. She explained that storytelling involves visual aids, whereas writing does not.

Granted, children’s picture books do provide illustrations in the form of visual aids, but they are not the same as storytelling’s visual aids.

Storytelling

Storytelling allows for the use of visual aids, which includes facial expressions. There is also voice tone, word pronunciation, along with word or phrase stressing that help aid in conveying sadness, anger, fear, and an array of other emotional sediments. This is also known as voice inflection.

Along with facial expressions and voice inflection, the storyteller can also take advantage of movement. Imagine telling a group of children a spooky story that has the protagonist tiptoeing around a corner to see what’s there. As a storyteller you can actually tiptoe, hunched over; and exaggerating the movement enhances the suspense. Visual aids are easy to use and are powerhouses of expressions.

Another example might be if you are telling a pirate story to a young boy. You can use toy props, such as a toy sword or pirate’s hat, while limping with a pretend wooden leg. These visuals enhance the story experience for the child without the storyteller having to create the imagery with words.

Writing a Story

Writing on the other hand depends solely on the writer’s interpretation of what the facial expressions, voice, mannerisms, image, and body movement of the characters might be. And, that interpretation must be conveyed through words that preferably ‘show’ rather than ‘tell.’

If you think about it, storytelling is much easier than writing a story. But, most of us authors are writers, not storytellers, and as writers we need to convey emotions and activity through showing.

In the storytelling examples above, how might you write the scene as an author?

For the first scenario of a spooky story, one example might be:

Lucas grabbed his little brother’s hand and pulled him close. “Shhh. Don’t make any noise. It might hear us.” They crept along the wall, barely breathing, until they reached the . . .

While this passage doesn’t have the advantage of the storyteller’s visual aids, it does convey a feeling of suspense and fear.

In regard to a pirate story, as an author you might write:

Captain Sebastian grabbed his sword and heaved it above his head. “Take the ship, men.”

The pirates seized the ropes and swung onto the ship. Swords and knives clanking, they overtook their enemy in under an hour.

This short passage clearly conveys a pirate scene with Captain Sebastian leading his men into a battle aboard another ship. No visual aids, but it does get its message across.

You might also note that while trying to write your story through showing, you need to watch for weak verbs, adjectives, and a host of other no-nos. In the sentence above, the words, “barely breathing” would probably need to be changed if it reached a publisher’s hands. Why? Because “ly” and “ing” words are also frowned upon.

So, knowing the difference, if you had your choice, which would you prefer to be, a storyteller or a writer?

I’d be a writer!

Writing for children tips

The Author Website – Do You Really Need One?
Picture Books – Story or Illustrations, Which Comes First?
Writing – Showing vs. Telling

WANT TO BE A CHILDREN’S WRITER?

Being a writer, like being any kind of artist who creates something from nothing, is an amazing ability. It’s almost like magic. And, you are in control. You decide what to create. The only limit you have is the cap on your imagination.

Check out my 180 page ebook that gives you all the basics of WRITING FICTION FOR CHILDREN (finding a publisher or agent, and marketing your books)

Writing Children's Fiction

Jun 18

6 Tips to What Makes a Good Story

7 writing elements to writing a good storyContributed by Aaron Shepard

Good writers often break rules—but they know they’re doing it! Here are some good rules to know.

Theme

A theme is something important the story tries to tell us—something that might help us in our own lives. Not every story has a theme, but it’s best if it does.

Don’t get too preachy. Let the theme grow out of the story, so readers feel they’ve learned it for themselves. You shouldn’t have to say what the moral is.

Plot

Plot is most often about a conflict or struggle that the main character goes through. The conflict can be with another character, or with the way things are, or with something inside the character, like needs or feelings.

The main character should win or lose at least partly on their own, and not just be rescued by someone or something else. Most often, the character learns or grows as they try to solve their problem. What the character learns is the theme.

The conflict should get more and more tense or exciting. The tension should reach a high point or “climax” near the end of the story, then ease off.

The basic steps of a plot are: conflict begins, things go right, things go WRONG, final victory (or defeat), and wrap-up. The right-wrong steps can repeat.

A novel can have several conflicts, but a short story should have only one.

Story Structure

At the beginning, jump right into the action. At the end, wind up the story quickly.

Decide about writing the story either in “first person” or in “third person.” Third-person pronouns are “he,” “she,” and “it”—so writing in third person means telling a story as if it’s all about other people. The first-person pronoun is “I”—so writing in first person means telling a story as if it happened to you.

Even if you write in third person, try to tell the story through the eyes of just one character—most likely the main character. Don’t tell anything that the character wouldn’t know. This is called “point of view.” If you must tell something else, create a whole separate section with the point of view of another character.

Decide about writing either in “present tense” or in “past tense.” Writing in past tense means writing as if the story already happened. That is how most stories are written. Writing in present tense means writing as if the story is happening right now. Stick to one tense or the other!

Characters

Before you start writing, know your characters well.

Your main character should be someone readers can feel something in common with, or at least care about.

You don’t have to describe a character completely. It’s enough to say one or two things about how a character looks or moves or speaks.

A main character should have at least one flaw or weakness. Perfect characters are not very interesting. They’re also harder to feel something in common with or care about. And they don’t have anything to learn. In the same way, there should be at least one thing good about a “bad guy.”

Setting

Set your story in a place and time that will be interesting or familiar.

Style and Tone

Use language that feels right for your story.

Wherever you can, use actions and speech to let readers know what’s happening. Show, don’t tell.

Give speech in direct quotes like “Go away!” instead of indirect quotes like “She told him to go away.”

You don’t have to write fancy to write well. It almost never hurts to use simple words and simple sentences. That way, your writing is easy to read and understand.

Always use the best possible word—the one that is closest to your meaning, sounds best, and creates the clearest image. If you can’t think of the right one, use a thesaurus.

Carefully check each word, phrase, sentence, and paragraph. Is it the best you can write? Is it in the right place? Do you need it at all? If not, take it out!

The strongest children’s stories have well-developed themes, engaging plots, suitable structure, memorable characters, well-chosen settings, and attractive style. For best results, build strength in all areas.

Originally published at:
http://www.aaronshep.com/youngauthor/elements.html

Writing for children tipsWriting – 6 Essential Steps to Publication
Writing with Focus
Ghostwriting Warning – Don’t Do This at Home

Let's talk about your children's writing projectLet me take a look at it. I’m a working children’s ghostwriter, rewriter, and editor. I can turn you story into a publishable and saleable book.

Shoot me an email at: kcioffiventrice@gmail.com (please put Children’s Writing Help in the Subject line). Or, you can give me a call at 834—347—6700