Jul 09

Are You a Writer? You’ve Got to Keep Learning and Growing

Writing tips and tricksGuest Post by Suzanne Lieurance

I can always tell when someone knows almost ‘nothing’ about writing.

They are the ones who think they already know ‘everything’.

They’re the ones who can’t be bothered to take a writing class or a writer’s workshop, or work with a writing coach.

They are the ones who believe they don’t need to have their work critiqued.

Or, if for some reason they do manage to have someone critique their work, they don’t think the suggestions they get for improving their writing have any merit.

After all, they already know how to write.

Why do they need to make things clearer?

Nonsense. If the reader can’t figure out what they are trying to say, that’s the fault of the reader, not theirs.

So why do I tell you all this?

To help you realize that all writers have much to learn.

All writers can benefit from a writing class, a writer’s workshop, or from working with a writing coach or a mentor.

The writers who tend to know the most about writing are the ones who realize how much they ‘don’t know’, and they do everything they can to learn more all the time.

Whether you’re new to writing or you’ve been at it for awhile, be sure you continue to read, read, read the types of things you wish to write.

Continue to take classes, attend writer’s workshops, and even work with a writing coach so you are learning more about the business of writing and the writing process all the time.

Above all else, practice, practice, practice your craft, which means you must simply, write, write, write.

For more writing tips and resources delivered to your e-mailbox every weekday morning, get your free subscription to The Morning Nudge from Suzanne Lieurance, the Working Writer’s Coach.

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Suzanne’s right. Honing your writing craft is a must, if you’re a writer.

But, what if you’re not a writer and don’t want to become one. But, what if you have this amazing idea for a children’s book and desperately want to get it published. You want your name as author on the book. What do you do?

You hire a children’s ghostwriter. You hire me!

Let me take a look at your idea or outline or story. I’m a working children’s ghostwriter and rewriter. I can turn your story into a publishable book that you’ll be proud to be author of.

Shoot me an email at: kcioffiventrice@gmail.com (please put Children’s Writing Help in the Subject line). Or, you can give me a call at 834—347—6700

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MORE ON WRITING FOR CHILDREN

Writing Skills – Spread Your Wings

Writing Success – Know Your Intent

10 Tips to Hiring With a Children’s Ghostwriter

Feb 12

Building a Writing Career Takes Practice and Focus

writing successMy 10 year old grandson is trying out for the All County Band in his area. He was telling me the piece he has to play is difficult. I told him that practice is a powerful tool. Just 10-15 minutes a day will help tremendously.

Obviously the more practice the better, but my grandson has ADHD. Reducing the amount of time on practicing doesn’t make it seem overwhelming – it’s doable.

This philosophy will work for anything, including writing.

What does it take to have a flourishing writing career?

1. Learn the craft and practice it.

To be a ‘good’ writer, an effective writer, a working writer, you need to know your craft. The only way to do this is to study it.

If you’re starting out, take a few courses online or offline or both. Get a strong grasp of the basics.

We’re all familiar with “practice makes perfect.”

There’s a reason that saying has lasted. It’s true.

Writing coach Suzanne Lieurance says, “Writing is a lot like gardening because it takes constant pruning and weeding.”

You need to keep up with your craft. Even as your get better at it, keep honing your craft. Keep learning more and more and practice, practice, practice

So, what does it mean to practice?

Simple. Write. Write. Write.

An excellent way to improve your writing skills is to copy (type and/or handwrite) content of a master in the niche you want to specialize in.

This is a copywriting trick. You actually write the master’s words and how to write professionally mentally sinks in.

Now, we all know that this is just a practice tool. We should never ever use someone else’s content as our own.

2. Focus in on a niche.

Have you heard the adage: A jack of all trades and master of none?

This is the reason you need to specialize.

You don’t want to be known as simply okay or good in a number of different niches. You want to be known as an expert in one or two niches.

This way, when someone is looking for a writer who specializes in, say, memoirs and autobiographies, you’re at the top of the list

I would recommend that your niches are related, like memoirs and autobiographies or being an author and book marketing.

Along with this, focus produces results.

According to an article in Psychology Today on focus and results, Dan Goleman Ph.D. says, “The more focused we are, the more successful we can be at whatever we do. And, conversely, the more distracted, the less well we do. This applies across the board: sports, school, career.

So, practice and focus your way to a successful writing career.

MORE ON WRITING FOR CHILDREN

Create a Believable Protagonist with Realistic Characteristics
Keep Your Writing Goals Front and Center
The Author Platform – You Definitely Need One and It Should Have Been Started Yesterday

Let's talk about your children's writing projectLet me take a look at it. I’m a working children’s ghostwriter, rewriter, and editor. I can turn you story into a publishable and saleable book.

Shoot me an email at: kcioffiventrice@gmail.com (please put Children’s Writing Help in the Subject line). Or, you can give me a call at 834—347—6700